Text 20 Oct

Photo 17 Oct 6,960 notes nevver:

Twin Peaks
Quote 17 Oct 93 notes
Never ask permission to do what it is you want to do. Just make the stuff that you think is the best you can do, and hope that it resonates with people. And when they come back and ask you to do something, say yes.
Photo 17 Oct 5 notes isabellamanfredi:

Happy Birthday. Hibernian Roof, favourite Opening Ceremony Pony Hair boots. by Kitty Callaghan

Great performance in Madison last night by The Preatures. Isabella was in top form!

isabellamanfredi:

Happy Birthday. Hibernian Roof, favourite Opening Ceremony Pony Hair boots. by Kitty Callaghan

Great performance in Madison last night by The Preatures. Isabella was in top form!

Photo 17 Oct Still puzzling at 832.2

Still puzzling at 832.2

Video 16 Oct 128 notes

pbstv:

To keep Chicago clean in the 1850s, engineer Ellis Chesbrough had the incredible idea to lift the city using jack screws.

Buildings, blocks and even neighborhoods were raised10 ft, (some were moved altogether!) to lay angled sewers underneath for draining.

During the process businesses proceeded without interuption, and by 1860, almost an entire acre of buildings, weighing about 35,000 tons, were lifted by more than 6,000 jack screws.

Tune in now to HOW WE GOT TO NOW to learn more.

Video 16 Oct 286 notes

pbstv:

Can you believe beer for breakfast was a healthy way to start the day?! That’s right, our ancestors would have several glasses a day! Why? Because the beer brewing process kills disease. So if you live in a dirty part of town, beer was in fact a sensible drink to have.

Hear more right with on PBS with HOW WE GOT TO NOW.

Photo 16 Oct 229 notes

(Source: gracespain)

Photo 13 Oct 109 notes putthison:

Fixing Snags
Fall is the season for sweaters and … snagging sweaters. If you end up getting a snag, there’s a good and bad way to fix it. 
The bad way is cutting it, which you absolutely don’t want to do. You might think that you’re getting rid of the pull, but over time, this area can develop a hole. 
A better solution is to pull the snag to the backside of the garment, so that the thread is still intact, but the damage is invisible. There are several ways to do this:
You can use a tool called a Snag Nab-It, which is basically a long needle with a rough end. Push it through your snag and the rough end will take it to the other side. I’ve used this successfully on knits and wovens (wovens meaning the non-stretchy material you find on dress shirts and trousers), but if your material is particularly fine or delicate, you might want to try another method. 
A gentler solution is to use a large sewing needle with a big eye. Couple this with a needle threader or some kind of thread, and use both to “catch” the snag as you pull the needle through. You can also use some thick embroidery or button thread, which you can wrap your snag on, and do the same thing. Remember, for something really delicate, go slow. It’s better to work this area a few times, rather than worsen the damage. 
For the truly patient, you can use also a large blunt needle and try to tease the yarn back to its original place. Pull the thread through to the next stitch, and then the next, and then the next — dispersing the excess material evenly across the row. You want to work both sides of the snag, so that everything looks natural. This easier on large gauge knits, but it’s possible with fine ones as well. Once your done, steam the area and admire your work. 

Neat tool

putthison:

Fixing Snags

Fall is the season for sweaters and … snagging sweaters. If you end up getting a snag, there’s a good and bad way to fix it. 

The bad way is cutting it, which you absolutely don’t want to do. You might think that you’re getting rid of the pull, but over time, this area can develop a hole. 

A better solution is to pull the snag to the backside of the garment, so that the thread is still intact, but the damage is invisible. There are several ways to do this:

  • You can use a tool called a Snag Nab-It, which is basically a long needle with a rough end. Push it through your snag and the rough end will take it to the other side. I’ve used this successfully on knits and wovens (wovens meaning the non-stretchy material you find on dress shirts and trousers), but if your material is particularly fine or delicate, you might want to try another method. 
  • A gentler solution is to use a large sewing needle with a big eye. Couple this with a needle threader or some kind of thread, and use both to “catch” the snag as you pull the needle through. You can also use some thick embroidery or button thread, which you can wrap your snag on, and do the same thing. Remember, for something really delicate, go slow. It’s better to work this area a few times, rather than worsen the damage. 

For the truly patient, you can use also a large blunt needle and try to tease the yarn back to its original place. Pull the thread through to the next stitch, and then the next, and then the next — dispersing the excess material evenly across the row. You want to work both sides of the snag, so that everything looks natural. This easier on large gauge knits, but it’s possible with fine ones as well. Once your done, steam the area and admire your work. 

Neat tool

Video 13 Oct 99,213 notes

ruckawriter:

worldoflis:

girldwarf:

Deconstructing Masculinity & Manhood with Michael Kimmel @ Dartmouth College

YAAAAEEESSSSSSS

You know what I like, and feel is so important? That he doesn’t say “Men thinks those are THEIR positions”. He says “We think those are OUR positions.”

As a male feminist, he still doesn’t exclude himself from the group of men.

Damn.

Well said.

(Source: exgynocraticgrrl)

Photo 13 Oct 83 notes roadworksco:

Pure class, no white shorts! Chapeau young sir.

roadworksco:

Pure class, no white shorts! Chapeau young sir.

(Source: inrng)

Video 13 Oct 237,783 notes

staff:

Have a good weekend, Tumblr.

(Source: kalstedom)

Photo 13 Oct 4,935 notes likeafieldmouse:

Wild Honeycomb
Video 6 Oct

Better Call Saul

Photo 6 Oct 20,708 notes tastefullyoffensive:

The Wisconsin Humane Society is really good at naming kittens. [via]

tastefullyoffensive:

The Wisconsin Humane Society is really good at naming kittens. [via]

via Dribble.

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